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Archive for the ‘Web Marketing’ Category

If your headline does not promise something of interest then your article won’t get read and you’ll struggle to capture the attention of your demographic. This is because most visitors arrive at a page, read a headline and then make a decision to stay or go.

Also, if a page is linked to, from elsewhere on your own site or others then your headline is likely to be used for the link. When reading headlines, potential readers are looking for what a page might do for them. They are looking for benefits and if your headline does not deliver, they are gone.

Here are a few guidelines for headline writing:

  • Promise benefits – tell readers what the content will do for them.
  • Don’t be clever or obscure and don’t make the reader think too much.
  • Don’t be ironic because most readers won’t know you are being ironic.
  • Don’t force readers to read the story in order to understand the headline.
  • Try asking a question about a problem and entice with the solution.
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  • Filed under: Web Marketing
  • People buy benefits not features

    If you want readers to read on you must SPELL OUT the benefits before describing and explaining the features.

    Features are the characteristics of what you’re selling.  Benefits are the things that those features will do for you.

    For example, people don’t buy light bulbs for features like being long lasting, bright and cheap. People buy light bulbs for benefits like saving money or the planet and helping them do things in what would otherwise be darkness.

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  • Filed under: Web Marketing
  • Visitors will enter your site through almost any page, not just your home page.  And for various reasons, many will not read more than one page.  Therefore, to maximize reader response you must treat every page as a marketing page.  So add compelling and persuasive sales content to all of your pages.  Be sure not to sounds “car salesman” like as this will turn off your visitors.  Make it have a purpose and a clear call-to-action.

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  • Filed under: Web Marketing
  • Marketing YOU! – Tailor the Self-Pitch

    Master the medium and your message.

    You know how to market your product or service, but do you know how to market yourself?

    You are the critical factor to successfully selling your product or service, so make sure your marketing and message aren’t outdated.

    It’s not just social networking.
    Facebook
    is no longer a site only used for reconnecting friendships or indulging your teenager’s need for constant communication. As of April, Facebook now has 200 million users, and its fastest growing segment is 35 years old and older. If you don’t have a page on Facebook, you’re missing out on an easy advertising medium. It takes just minutes to create a Facebook page, and soon, you can be establishing yourself as a leader in your field, developing your personal brand and creating more visibility for yourself, your product or your service.

    Sign up with LinkedIn so you can easily be found with a Google search. LinkedIn is a business networking site where you can personalize your own page, broadcast your professional history and post testimonials from others. The contacts you link up and interact with, the more expansive your network. View LinkedIn as an opportunity to build your contacts, expand your network and increase your credibility.

    Twitter began as a way to easily stay in touch with family, friends and business contacts by answering a simple question: What are you doing? But, now, Twitter also can be a marketing tool. Users “tweet” by sending short messages via mobile texting, instant message or the Web. Savvy business owners tweet to draw attention to a product, event, resource, blog or Web site. Use Twitter to find out what people are saying about a competitor or you. Show the human side of your business by discussing the good things people in your company are doing. Find out your contacts’ interests, or share some of your own. Get feedback on a problem or answers to questions. Organize meetings or “Tweetups.” Or, follow your mentors by seeing what they are tweeting about.

    Don’t throw in the kitchen sink.
    If you are pulling out your résumé or portfolio to land that next big project or make a career shift, focus on accomplishments and work samples related to the position you are seeking. Prospective employers or business partners don’t want to be inundated with a chronology of everything you’ve ever done. Follow the same process for your references. Specifically select those relating to what you’re pursuing, and don’t use the same three references for every new opportunity. Take time to tailor your self-pitch.

    Be yourself.
    People can sense fake a mile away. Skip the stilted business-speak and give a real sense of your personality with natural conversation and writing. If you think it doesn’t sound like you, it probably isn’t you.

    ———————————————

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    Q: Do you have questions on How, What, Where and Why?

    Q: Are you afraid that your personal information will end up in the wrong hands?

    If you can answer YES to any of these quesstions you need to schedule a FREE 15 minute conference call with myself to discuss your concerns, fears and reservations with social media. Embracing the technology is part of the battle, but let me assure you that you will reap the benefits of having the ability to showcase yourself as a Brand, targeting millions of businesses and people that need your services or products, even if they do not know it yet.

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    The Best Website Analyzer On The Web

    I know that there are actually thousands of web tool out there which provides SEO (Search Engine Optimization) stats for webmasters or bloggers to find out how well their websites perform as compared to others. Even though you usually check your stats using these popular tools, I’d suggest you trying out a newly-launched service known as PageBoss.

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  • Filed under: Web Marketing
  • You’ve got a website. It’s got some cool graphics and information about your company and maybe even a shopping cart for selling products. You’ve tweaked your copy and checked your tags, yet your visitors don’t seem to do what you want them to do.

    It’s time to take a step back and think about why you built a website in the first place.

    “We have to have a website — everybody does!” This is the mentality of many business sites.

    With that goal, inevitably you’ll end up with someone in upper management complaining that the site isn’t getting enough results to justify the expenses, although no one is sure how many sales or leads are attributed to the website. Or the CEO wants to know why the site’s PageRank is only a four, and traffic patterns don’t match last year’s numbers. Suddenly, everyone’s scrambling around to “fix” something that may not even be a problem. Sound familiar?

    The problem is that many sites are built without a clear goal in mind. It sounds silly, but it’s true. It’s time to take two steps back and take a big-picture look at your website and what it can do for your business.

    So what’s the goal of your website?

    • To inform?
    • To build a community?
    • To gain valuable market research?
    • To reduce support and customer service costs?
    • To reach a broad audience with a message?
    • To find sales leads?
    • To conduct e-commerce?
    • To entertain?
    • To gain advertising revenue?
    • To brand your company?
    • To brand yourself?
    • To attract attention?
    • To build trust?
    • To reduce paperwork?
    • To reduce printing and mailing costs?
    • To pre-qualify leads?
    • To recruit new employees?
    • To ??????  (insert your need here)

    These are just some of the many possibilities. Remember, the Web is not just a marketing tool — it’s a business tool as well. While it is perfectly okay to have an Internet billboard that simply contains contact information, why settle for that when your site can do so much more? Even the smallest local business can utilize the power of the Internet to be more efficient and to build revenue. Once you start thinking about it, it’s easy to get excited about the potential for your site.

    Once you have an idea of what you need the site to do, you’ve got to agree on some measurable goals. Too many people think traffic is the goal of a website. But think about it; would you rather have 1,000 people visit your site and do nothing, or have 100 people visit your site and take action? Does a PageRank of 7 mean anything to the real profitability of your company? These abstract, relative numbers don’t make a difference by themselves, and should not be the ultimate goal of any website.

    More important are goals like new sales leads, an increase in average consumer satisfaction, decreased support calls, more sales, increased newsletter subscriptions or completed surveys. These are all measurable goals that DO mean something to your company.

    Next, identify your target audience. Narrow this definition down to fit your unique customers. It’s time to think like your target audience. What do they need? What problem does your your product or service solve for them? Why are they even visiting your site? If you can’t get into their mindset, organize an informal focus group and ask them what they want. It’s that easy! Let them poke around your current site and give you feedback. Usability issues can be identified during this process as well.

    You may find you need a formal usability analysis, a redesign or new content sections. Sometimes it’s even better to scrap the old site and start over from scratch. The important thing is that when you build a great site that keeps your users in mind, it will be easier to get good links, good rankings and all around good results. Your company and your customers will benefit.

    If you want success online, contact us for a free 30 min conference call

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